We use cookies on this site to enable your digital experience. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our cookie policy. close
Focus On
In-House Counsel | Insurance | Intellectual Property | Immigration | Natural Resources | Real Estate | Tax

Ottawa announces two appointments to Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Monday, February 04, 2019 @ 12:48 PM | By John Chunn


The federal Department of Canadian Heritage on Jan. 31 announced that Michèle Rivet has been appointed as vice-chair and Julie Jai has been appointed as a trustee to the board of trustees of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.

According to the government’s press release, Rivet was a judge for 30 years. She founded and was appointed first president of the Quebec Human Rights Tribunal when it was established in 1990 and remained in that position until 2010. Since then, she has been an associate professor in the Faculty of Law at the Université de Sherbrooke.

Rivet is also a museologist. In addition to the undergraduate studies she completed in the Faculty of Law at the Université de Montréal and the diplôme d’études supérieures from the Université de Paris, Rivet also obtained a master’s degree in museology from the Université de Montréal. She received the Order of Canada in 2018.

Jai is a legal and policy professional with recognized expertise in human rights and Charter of Rights and Freedoms issues, Indigenous law issues and pensions and employment law. She is a public sector executive with experience in the governments of Canada, Ontario and Yukon, including work with First Nations.

Jai is a part-time member of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario. She graduated from York University with a bachelor of laws and from the University of Toronto with a master of laws.

"As Canadians, we can be proud of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights — the first museum solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. The extensive experience of these new appointees will support the museum in its mandate to enhance public understanding of human rights, promote respect for others, and encourage reflection and dialogue,” said Pablo Rodriguez, minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism.