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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, April 12, 2019 @ 3:59 PM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

Lametti says no need for Trudeau gov’t to probe ‘one-off’ SCC leak; but demand grows for RCMP investigation
Justice Minister David Lametti says a damaging leak about the latest Supreme Court of Canada appointment was a “one-off” that did not come from his department or the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) — nor does it require the Trudeau government to track down the leak’s source(s) or reconsider the adequacy of the confidentiality protections around the Supreme Court appointment process.

Bill requiring named judges to disclose expenses changed so only anonymized expenses to be published
Judges would no longer have to disclose their individual expenses under amendments to Bill C-58 accepted by the Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee April 10.

Combination of patent law, copyright can protect AI innovation, panel suggests
How courts deal with the concept of authorship is an area to watch as artificial intelligence (AI) becomes more creative and humanlike, noted panellists at Bracing for Impact: The Artificial Intelligence Challenge Part II conference series hosted by IP Osgoode.

Independent pay commission recommends pay parity for military judges
An independent judicial pay commission says Canada’s four military judges merit the same pay as their counterparts on other federally appointed courts — currently $329,900 per year for puisne judges — notwithstanding Ottawa’s arguments that there are already plenty of qualified applicants for the $229,793-per-annum military posts (as of 2014) that have required military judges to sit less than one week per month, on average.

Is Philpott correct to say PM broke the law?
In her column, Heather MacIvor writes: “On April 9, Dr. Jane Philpott — now the Independent MP for Markham-Stouffville — rose in the House of Commons and accused Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of breaking the law. She claimed that his unilateral decision to expel her and Jody Wilson-Raybould from the Liberal caucus on April 2 was inconsistent with the Parliament of Canada Act (PCA).”

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer’s Daily.