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Moreau named chief justice of Alberta Court of Queen's Bench

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 @ 2:52 PM | By Carolyn Gruske


Justice Mary T. Moreau, a member of the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta, has been promoted to the role of chief justice.

“I'm pleased to announce the appointment of Mary T. Moreau as chief justice of the Court of Queen's Bench of Alberta. The first woman appointed to this position, Chief Justice Moreau brings more than 20 years’ experience within this very organization to her new role. I wish her every success as she takes the next step in her remarkable legal career,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Chief Justice Morneau is known for her involement in education, administration and strategic planning. For six years, she served as co-chair of the National Judicial Institute’s annual spring National Criminal Law Conference, and she regularly lectures at judicial education programs. She is a member of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Ethics, and a member of the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta’s Strategic Planning Committee. Bilingual in English and French, Chief Justice Morneau is co-founder of the Association des juristes d'expression française de l’Alberta, and is a member of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs’ Judicial Advisory Committee on International Engagement.

In 2013, she received the Canadian Superior Court Judges Association’s Presidents Award, and is a former president of the association.

In addition to presiding in the province of Alberta, Chief Justice Morneau serves as a deputy justice in the Northwest Territories and Yukon.

Before being appointed to the bench, Chief Justice Moreau practised criminal law, constitutional law and civil litigation in Edmonton

She replaces Chief Justice Neil C. Wittmann, who resigned on May 1, 2017, after nearly 18 years of distinguished service as a judge.