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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, March 23, 2018 @ 3:29 PM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

Judge who sexually harassed court staffer quietly quit; unlike the U.S., #MeToo hasn’t hit Canadian judiciary
A superior court judge who subjected a court staffer to sexualized contact in the workplace quietly resigned after a Canadian Judicial Council (CJC) investigation, without the judicial disciplinary body publicly disclosing his actions until now

McLachlin nominated for Hong Kong’s top court
Beverley McLachlin, Canada’s former top judge with a strong record of defending judicial independence here and abroad, is expected to soon join Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal as a non-permanent member.

Concerns raised about growing trend to oral judgments at Supreme Court
Some Supreme Court watchers are raising questions and concerns about the top court’s growing practice of disposing of cases orally from the bench, without subsequently issuing written reasons.

SCC convicts Bruce Carson, interprets influence-peddling offence broadly
The Supreme Court has broadly defined the crime of influence peddling in a decision which affirms 8-1 the conviction of Bruce Carson for selling his influence with the then-Harper government to assist a water filtration company to sell water treatment systems to Indigenous bands.

Goodale tables gun law aimed at enhancing public safety
The Trudeau government is proposing legislation to more strictly regulate guns and roll back contentious reforms made by the predecessor Conservative government.

A modest proposal concerning bias in the jury system
In his analysis article, Tony Paas writes: “While a further debate on legislative changes to peremptory challenges is welcomed, the Criminal Code already provides for an effective means of challenging potential racial bias in the jury system where the victim is Indigenous or a visible minority.”

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer's Daily.