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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, October 05, 2018 @ 2:14 PM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

Canadian judges rally around judge facing discipline for accepting interim law dean post at Lakehead University
Canada’s superior court judges are collectively going to court to defend an Ontario judge who faces discipline proceedings, and possible firing, for acting as interim law dean (academic) at Lakehead University — a temporary post Ontario Superior Court Justice Patrick Smith agreed to take for six months while the struggling law school seeks a permanent dean, and with the advance blessing of both his chief justice and the federal Justice minister.

SCC rules 7-2 that parliamentary privilege does not pre-empt grievances from workers fired by Quebec’s legislature
In a far-reaching clarification of the scope of the parliamentary privilege of legislatures across Canada, the Supreme Court has ruled 7-2 that the speaker of Quebec’s National Assembly cannot rely on such privilege to immunize from review by a labour tribunal his decision to fire three security guards for on-the-job misconduct.

Challenges await with NAFTA 2.0, say lawyers
There still may be life in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), because its recently reached successor pact — the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) — is not quite a done deal. However, lawyers still need to be prepared for the NAFTA-to-UMSCA transition, according to an international trade lawyer who serves as a NAFTA dispute resolution panellist.

Law Society of Ontario in danger of losing self-governance if Convocation shrinks, lawyers say
As the deadline for comment on changes to the Law Society of Ontario’s (LSO) governance structure draws near, members of the profession are drawing attention to the loss of institutional knowledge and concerns over effective self-governance, if Convocation shrinks in size.

Is there employment life after #MeToo?
In his column Stuart Rudner writes: “What is an employer to do when they receive an application from someone that they know, or suspect, was previously outed as a sexual harasser?”

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer’s Daily.