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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, May 17, 2019 @ 2:18 PM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

SCC’s Gascon says he is ‘fully capable’ of performing judicial duties after recent ‘panic attack’
Lawyers and judges are praising Supreme Court of Canada Justice Clément Gascon, who has experienced some dark days recently, for shining a bright light on anxiety and depression — two conditions with which he and thousands of other Canadians contend.

Top court rules B.C. must offer trials in French for provincial offences
The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled 9-0 that persons charged in British Columbia with motor vehicle and other provincial offences have the right to be tried in French, on request — ending the practice of offering only English trials for provincial offences in that province (and arguably other provinces with similar statutes, such as Newfoundland and P.E.I.).

Ottawa revises appointment process to give Quebec more say in filling province’s three SCC seats
Ottawa and Quebec have struck what they dub a “historic agreement” to give the province greater say in the selection of Supreme Court of Canada judges from Quebec — a key demand made by the new nationalist Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) government.

ONCA rules docs’ religious objections to MAiD, abortion, other health care don’t trump patients’ right of access
In a far-reaching decision that could go to the Supreme Court of Canada, the Ontario Court of Appeal has affirmed the constitutionality of the “effective referral” requirements imposed on doctors by the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Decision on Indigenous hunting rights ‘will be picked up in other parts of the world’: lawyer
An Indigenous man from the United States has had his acquittal for unlawful hunting upheld after the B.C. Court of Appeal has ruled his Aboriginal right to hunt was protected by the Canadian Constitution.

SCC rules immigration detainees can apply to provincial superior courts for habeas corpus
The Supreme Court of Canada has affirmed 6-1 that persons detained pursuant to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) may seek habeas corpus review in superior court when the detainee contends that the detention’s length, uncertain duration or conditions are illegal.

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer’s Daily.