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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, August 23, 2019 @ 11:49 AM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

SNC-Lavalin report shows need for strict protocols for politicians’ interactions with AG in prosecutions
The attorney general — and only the attorney general — may decide if overruling the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) in a criminal prosecution is in the “public interest” — even if the prime minister and senior government officials question the AG’s due diligence and motives, or believe she otherwise failed to properly assess the public interest.

Law society aims to save role of paralegals, law students and articling students post-Bill C-75
At its next Convocation, the Law Society of Ontario (LSO) will vote on regulatory changes for its paralegals, law students and articling students in a bid to keep non-lawyer agents in play when new federal rules come into force barring them from acting in summary offence cases.

Some bar groups leery of top judge’s idea that appellate nominees face public scrutiny
Chief Justice of Canada Richard Wagner believes introducing appellate court nominees to the public would bolster confidence in the judiciary — but he’s not advocating any particular method of doing so, his office tells The Lawyer’s Daily.

Judges facing firing for misconduct would no longer build pension while fighting removal
Ottawa is working on a draft law to stop federal judges whose firing has been recommended by the Canadian Judicial Council (CJC) from continuing to build up their lucrative pensions as they unsuccessfully challenge their proposed removal for months or years at taxpayers’ expense.

Retirement from SCC should not be a life sentence
In her column, Kyla Lee writes: “Since the Trudeau ethics report was released last week, a small commotion has erupted in the legal community. The commotion centres around whether retired Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) judges should be permitted to return to private practice, and whether in doing so they can be weaponized against one another.”

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer’s Daily.