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Tuesday, September 10, 2019 @ 12:47 PM

Health, safety, vacation differences between U.S. and Canada employment laws Americanpills

This is the final installation in a three-part series about differences between American and Canadian employment laws. Part one addressed employment agreements; part two explained termination, payroll and overtime issues. ... [read more]

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 @ 11:50 AM

In Callidus Capital, SCC looks at litigation funding | Julius Melnitzer

With the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision to hear the appeal in 9354-9186 Québec inc., et al. v. Callidus Capital Corporation 2018 QCCA 632, litigation funding will for the first time be front and centre at the high court. ... [read more]

Friday, September 06, 2019 @ 9:27 AM

Senate report on charitable sector: Building strength charity_report_sm

On Jan. 30, 2018, the Special Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector met and consulted with stakeholders in the charitable and not-for-profit community. It was carrying out its mandate to “examine the impact of federal and provincial laws and policies governing charities, non-profit organizations, foundations, and other similar groups; and to examine the impact of the voluntary sector in Canada.” ... [read more]

Friday, September 06, 2019 @ 9:17 AM

Predicting just cause for dismissal a mug’s game | Stuart Rudner

When it comes to just cause for dismissal, the only absolute rule is that there are no absolute rules. ... [read more]

Thursday, September 05, 2019 @ 11:45 AM

SCC alumni’s role in legal controversies sparks new debate over ex-judges’ return to practice Amy Salyzyn

Is it in the public interest for former Supreme Court of Canada justices to be allowed to provide legal services to governments or other well-heeled clients facing public controversies that could arguably blow back on the reputations of the ex-judges’ former courts or otherwise harm public confidence in the judiciary? ... [read more]

Thursday, September 05, 2019 @ 9:23 AM

Time to change ‘unwelcome’ conduct requirement in sexual harassment cases: UBC report Bethany Hastie, UBC School of Law

A report out of the University of British Columbia is recommending changes in the way human rights bodies look at sexual harassment cases. The study, written by UBC law professor Bethany Hastie, analyzes workplace sexual harassment decisions by the Ontario and B.C. Human Rights Tribunals from 2000 to 2018. ... [read more]

Thursday, September 05, 2019 @ 8:30 AM

Legal operations: The business side of law legal_operations_sm

A lot has been written about legal operations recently. Is it a new function, a business solution or maybe even a complete overhaul of the legal industry framework? Whatever the case, it is an important topic for today’s legal professional.   ... [read more]

Wednesday, September 04, 2019 @ 8:53 AM

Alberta Court of Appeal clarifies time limit for filing privacy breach civil actions Womanexamining

On May 13, 2019, the Alberta Court of Appeal clarified the limitation period for filing civil claims for privacy breaches. This is the first time the Court of Appeal has written a decision about s. 60 of the Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA). ... [read more]

Tuesday, September 03, 2019 @ 8:46 AM

Thin line between cybersecurity certification, compliance for SMEs cybersecurity_compliance_sm

There’s never been a dearth of guidance over the last half-a-decade or so from national and provincial regulators in Canada for businesses to improve their cybersecurity programs. But, in a first-of-its-kind federal initiative, Minister of Finance Bill Morneau, on Aug. 12, launched CyberSecure Canada, a pilot voluntary certification program to help small and medium enterprises (SMEs) “raise the cybersecurity baseline” and “increase consumer confidence.” The initiative is akin to the Cyber Essentials certification program of the New Brunswick government, launched in 2017. ... [read more]

Friday, August 30, 2019 @ 9:20 AM

Terror in the courts | Lawrence David

The concept of “terror” is not one commonly associated with civil litigation. “Terror” and “terrorism” instead overwhelmingly arise in the context of national security prosecutions, refugee status determinations and the listing of terrorist entities under Part II.1 of the Criminal Code. Still, many civil litigators are or may quickly become familiar with another form of “terror in the courts” — namely, the in terrorem doctrine. ... [read more]