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Thursday, September 19, 2019 @ 9:11 AM

Legal aid, auto insurance among areas of focus for new B.C. bar association president CBABC president Ken Armstrong

The new president of the Canadian Bar Association, B.C. Branch (CBABC) says there is a crisis in the provincial legal aid system that is seeing too many people miss out on the proper supports they need. Ken Armstrong, who took office as CBABC president Sept. 1 after previously serving as vice-president and secretary-treasurer, said the CBABC “needs to continue to keep pressure on the government” on legal aid. ... [read more]

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 @ 6:25 AM

AUTOMOBILE insurance - Compulsory government scheme - Uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage

Appeal by the insurer from a decision confirming an arbitrator’s order that the appellant was required to pay insurance benefits. ... [read more]

Tuesday, September 17, 2019 @ 9:52 AM

Scarfo re-elected as Blaney McMurtry’s managing partner

The partners of Blaney McMurtry LLP announced that they have re-elected Maria Scarfo as managing partner for a third three-year term. ... [read more]

Monday, September 16, 2019 @ 10:43 AM

Yikes, my kid is going to law school | Marcel Strigberger

So, your kid is about to follow your footsteps and pursue a legal career? What are your trepidations? ... [read more]

Monday, September 16, 2019 @ 9:46 AM

Ride share or ride scare? Uber car driving

Uber hit the market first and Lyft followed shortly thereafter. Technology enabled individuals to conveniently obtain transportation services with real time information and a cashless system. Polite drivers in clean vehicles, combined with the ease of technology used by Uber and Lyft, gained swift traction with the public. However, it hasn’t been happily ever after for these companies. ... [read more]

Wednesday, September 11, 2019 @ 10:36 AM

Art as loan collateral: What lenders want art_collection_sm

You are a collector in Canada of Canadian and international art and now have an opportunity to purchase another important artwork for your collection. You do not have ready cash. You do not want to tie up your personal or business credit, since it may be needed for other purposes. You think about whether you can utilize your existing art collection as collateral, normally a non-revenue generating asset.   ... [read more]

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 @ 4:10 PM

Apportionment or double counting in determining catastrophic impairment Brain on blue background

Under the Statutory Accident Benefit Schedule (SABS) and associated case law, an applicant will meet the legal definition of catastrophic impairment pursuant to the SABS if it is determined that he/she has suffered a combination of physical and psychological impairments that amount to a whole person impairment in excess of 55 per cent. ... [read more]

Tuesday, September 10, 2019 @ 10:48 AM

Never give your phone to police even as proof of vehicle registration Fingerprint cellphone

Recently, the Ontario government announced that it would permit drivers to carry digital proof of registration for their vehicles. This would mean that any time a police officer stopped a vehicle and asked for proof of a licence, insurance and registration, the driver could simply hand over their phone to the officer to satisfy the registration requirement. ... [read more]

Monday, September 09, 2019 @ 11:47 AM

Ontario drivers get green light for electronic proof of auto insurance Woman holding cellphone

As of Sept. 5, Ontario has become the fourth jurisdiction in Canada to approve the use of electronic proof of auto insurance, allowing drivers to display their auto insurance card on their mobile devices. The approval, granted by the Financial Services Regulatory Authority of Ontario and announced by Minister of Finance Rod Phillips, gives consumers a convenient alternative to the paper “pink card” version. ... [read more]

Thursday, September 05, 2019 @ 11:45 AM

SCC alumni’s role in legal controversies sparks new debate over ex-judges’ return to practice Amy Salyzyn

Is it in the public interest for former Supreme Court of Canada justices to be allowed to provide legal services to governments or other well-heeled clients facing public controversies that could arguably blow back on the reputations of the ex-judges’ former courts or otherwise harm public confidence in the judiciary? ... [read more]