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Friday, March 24, 2017 @ 9:02 AM

Media relations isn't marketing, and that's just the first mistake lawyers make | Julius Melnitzer

When it comes to maximizing the benefits of good media relations, many Canadian law firms haven’t quite got it yet. For those of you who are thinking, “What are you talking about? The profession’s marketing savvy has come a very long way” — you’re making my point. What a lot of law firms still don’t seem to understand is that marketing and media relations are two distinct arts. Lumping them together is akin to shoving an admiralty lawyer and an entertainment lawyer into the same pigeonhole. ... [read more]

Thursday, March 23, 2017 @ 8:00 PM

Environmental Law - Environmental assessments - Canadian Environmental Assessment Act - Decisions of Governor in Council - Aboriginal issues - Traditional uses and traditional environmental knowledge

Appeal by The Prophet River First Nation and the West Moberly First Nations from a decision denying their application for judicial review of a decision by the Governor in Council (GIC). The appellants were British Columbia Treaty 8 First Nations. BC Hydro purported to take up Treaty 8 lands for the Site C Clean Energy Project (Site C Project), a hydroelectric dam on the Peace River. The GIC’s decision deemed that although the Site C Project would likely cause significant adverse environmental effects, including adverse effects on the Aboriginal peoples use of lands and resources for traditional purposes, these effects were justified in the circumstances pursuant to s. 52(4) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). The Site C Project was issued federal authorization to proceed by Order in Council. On judicial review, the judge found that the Crown had met its duty to consult and accommodate and that there was no requirement on the part of the GIC to determine the appellants’ treaty rights and whether the Site C Project unjustifiably infringed their treaty rights under s. 35(1) of the Constitution Act. The appellants submitted that the judge erred in applying a reasonableness standard of review, in concluding that the GIC was not required to determine treaty rights, and in concluding that a judicial review was not the appropriate forum to determine the appellants’ treaty rights and whether they had been infringed. ... [read more]

Thursday, March 23, 2017 @ 3:48 PM

B.C. law firm collaborates with indigenous communities to translate traditional laws Maxine Matilpi

West Coast Environmental Law (WCEL) is working with indigenous communities across British Columbia to identify legal principles in their traditional stories. These ancient laws are unique to each community and identify principles related to rights and standards of environmental governance. ... [read more]

Thursday, March 23, 2017 @ 10:35 AM

Dentons expands eastern Europe reach with new Tbilisi office

Global law firm Dentons is expanding its presence in Central and Eastern Europe by opening an office in Tbilisi, Georgia. ... [read more]

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 @ 9:09 AM

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS - Canadian Environmental Assessment Act - Decisions of Governor in Council - Aboriginal issues - Traditional uses and traditional environmental knowledge

Appeal by The Prophet River First Nation and the West Moberly First Nations from a decision denying their application for judicial review of a decision by the Governor in Council (GIC). The appellants were British Columbia Treaty 8 First Nations. BC Hydro purported to take up Treaty 8 lands for the Site C Clean Energy Project (Site C Project), a hydroelectric dam on the Peace River. The GIC’s decision deemed that although the Site C Project would likely cause significant adverse environmental effects, including adverse effects on the Aboriginal peoples use of lands and resources for traditional purposes, these effects were justified in the circumstances pursuant to s. 52(4) of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). The Site C Project was issued federal authorization to proceed by Order in Council. On judicial review, the judge found that the Crown had met its duty to consult and accommodate and that there was no requirement on the part of the GIC to determine the appellants’ treaty rights and whether the Site C Project unjustifiably infringed their treaty rights under s. 35(1) of the Constitution Act. The appellants submitted that the judge erred in applying a reasonableness standard of review, in concluding that the GIC was not required to determine treaty rights, and in concluding that a judicial review was not the appropriate forum to determine the appellants’ treaty rights and whether they had been infringed. ... [read more]

Friday, March 17, 2017 @ 1:21 PM

Lawyer/scientist Anand joins Gilbert's LLP

Nisha Anand has joined Gilbert’s LLP as a partner. ... [read more]

Friday, March 10, 2017 @ 12:48 PM

Cassels Brock welcomes new partners Buttery and Williams

Cassels Brock announced the continued expansion of its client service offerings in restructuring and insolvency law with the addition of Mary Buttery and Lance Williams as partners in the firm’s Vancouver office. ... [read more]

Monday, March 06, 2017 @ 1:16 PM

Crown won't appeal order to pay legal costs of indigenous men after withdrawing from land dispute case

The Crown is not appealing an Ontario Court of Justice ruling that it must pay the legal costs of three indigenous men after deciding it was not going to proceed with their prosecution in a long-running land dispute case. ... [read more]

Thursday, March 02, 2017 @ 7:00 PM

Métis Nation of Ontario, Ottawa sign memo of understanding 

Not applicable ... [read more]

Thursday, March 02, 2017 @ 7:00 PM

Natural Resources Law - PUBLIC UTILITIES - Regulatory tribunals - Practice and procedure - Appeals - Provincial boards, tribunals and commissions

Application by five members of the Enoch Cree Nation for permission to appeal a decision by the Alberta Utilities Commission with a stay pending appeal. The decision at issue granted a final time extension for completion of construction of a TransAlta transmission line rebuild that crossed lands occupied by the Enoch Cree Nation. The applicants held certificates of possession, but were not party to any of the prior proceedings, including the Commission’s initial decision approving the rebuild. The applicants sought to appeal the Commission’s final time extension decision on the basis TransAlta should have obtained a s. 28(2) Indian Act permit prior to conducting the work, the Commission failed to give notice of the request for a time extension, and the prior decisions of the Commission ought not to have been granted. ... [read more]