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The Friday Brief

The Friday Brief: Managing Editor’s must-read items from this week

Friday, January 11, 2019 @ 2:44 PM | By Matthew Grace


Matthew Grace %>
Matthew Grace
Here are my picks for the top stories we published this week.

Supreme Court strikes down federal voting limits on Canadian expatriates
In a landmark judgment on the Charter-guaranteed right to vote, the Supreme Court of Canada has declared unconstitutional federal provisions (that were recently amended by Parliament) that barred expatriate Canadians who were residing abroad for five years or more from voting in federal elections.

First law school officially endorsed for Newfoundland and Labrador
When Memorial College, now Memorial University, was founded in Newfoundland and Labrador almost a century ago, plans to build a law school were built into the charter. Those plans are now coming to fruition.

Ontario court deems Uber’s mandatory arbitration clause ‘unconscionable’
The Ontario Court of Appeal has reversed a lower court decision in a proposed class action against Uber. The court determined that the company’s arbitration provision, which sends matters for arbitration to the Netherlands, represents an “unfair bargain” and is “unconscionable.”

Proposed changes to Law Society Tribunal Rules of Practice highlight modernization, accessibility
Improved accessibility through technology, plain language and transparency are some of the goals behind proposed changes to the Law Society Tribunal’s Rules of Practice, which committee members hope will lead to enhanced best practices for the tribunal.

Wellness: Second thoughts about cannabis
In his column, Darryl Singer writes: “I think I have recently changed my mind on cannabis. Not in terms of me starting to use it, but in terms of making sure my kids do not.”

Matthew Grace is the Managing Editor of The Lawyer’s Daily.